A Branch of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division

Insignificant Activities List

Unless otherwise required by the Director, the following air pollutant sources/activities must be listed, but need not be described in detail, in the Part 70 permit application.  Exclusion of these emissions from detailed reporting does not exclude them from inclusion in any applicability determination.  Additionally, this insignificant listing may not be used to avoid any applicable requirement (i.e. NESHAP, NSPS, etc.) as defined in 40 CFR Part 70.2.

Mobile Sources

  • Cleaning and sweeping of streets and paved surfaces.

Combustion Equipment

  • Fire fighting and similar safety equipment used to train fire fighters or other emergency personnel.
     
  • Small incinerators that are not subject to any standard, limitation or other requirement under Section 111 or 112 (excluding 112(r)) of the Federal Act and are not considered a "designated facility" as specified in 40 CFR 60.32e of the Federal emissions guidelines for Hospital/Medical/ Infectious Waste Incinerators, that are operating as follows:
    • Less than 8 million Btu's per hour heat input, firing types 0, 1, 2 and/or 3 waste; or
    • Less than 8 million Btu's per hour heat input with no more than 10% pathological (type-4) waste by weight combined with types 0, 1, 2 and/or 3 waste; or

    • Less than 4 million Btu's per hour heat input firing type 4 waste.

       

For the purpose of this subsection, the following definitions apply:

  • Type 0 waste means trash.  This refers to a mixture of combustible waste such as paper, cardboard, wood and floor sweepings; which contains up to 10% petrochemical waste, 5% non-combustibles and 10% moisture, by weight; which is generated from commercial activities; and having a higher heat value (HHV) of approximately 8,500 Btu/lb.
     
  • Type 1 waste means rubbish.  This refers to a mixture of combustible waste such as paper, cardboard, wood foliage and floor sweepings; which contains up to 10% petrochemical waste, 5% non-combustibles and 10% moisture, by weight; which is generated from domestic and commercial activities; and having a HHV of approximately 6,500 Btu/lb.
     
  • Type 2 waste means refuse.  This refers to an evenly distributed mixture of rubbish and garbage as usually received in municipal waste; which contains up to 50% moisture content, by weight and 7% non-combustible solids; and having a HHV of approximately 4,300 Btu/lb.
     
  • Type 3 waste means garbage.  This refers to animal and vegetable wastes from restaurants, cafeterias, hotels, markets, and like installations; which contains up to 70% moisture, by weight, and 5% non-combustible solids; and having a HHV of approximately 2,500 Btu/lb.
     
  • Type 4 waste means human and animal remains.  This refers to carcasses, organs, and solid organic wastes from hospitals, laboratories, abattoirs, animal pounds; and having a HHV of approximately 1,000 Btu/lb.
     
  • Open burning in compliance with Georgia Rule 391-3-1-.02(5).
     
  • Stationary engines burning:
    Natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, or dual fuels which are used exclusively as emergency generators; or
    Natural gas, LPG, and/or diesel fueled generators used for emergency and/or peaking power generation, where the peaking power generation does not exceed 200 hours per year; or
    Natural gas, LPG, and/or diesel fuel used for other purposes, provided that the output of each engine does not exceed 400 horsepower and that no individual engine operates for more than 2 thousand hours per year; or
    Gasoline used for other purposes, provided that the output of each engine does not exceed 100 horsepower and that no individual engine operates for more than 500 hours per year.

For the purpose of this subsection, the following definitions shall apply:

  • An "emergency generator" means a generator whose function is to provide backup power when electric power from the local utility is interrupted and which operates for less than 500 hours per year.
     
  • "Used for peaking power" means used to reduce the electrical power requirements on the local utility grid.  This could be for supplying power during the local utility's peak demand periods, or for peak shaving by the facility.

Trade Operations

  • Brazing, soldering and welding equipment, and cutting torches related manufacturing and construction activities whose emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) fall below 1,000 pounds per year.

Maintenance, Cleaning, and Housekeeping

  • Blast-cleaning equipment using a suspension of abrasive in water and any exhaust system (or collector) serving them exclusively.

  • Portable blast-cleaning equipment.

  • Non-Perchloroethylene Dry-cleaning equipment with a capacity of 100 pounds per hour or less of clothes.

  • Cold cleaners having an air/vapor interface of not more than 10 square feet and that do not use a halogenated solvent.

  • Non-routine clean out of tanks and equipment for the purposes of worker entry or in preparation for maintenance or decommissioning.

  • Devices used exclusively for cleaning metal parts or surfaces by burning off residual amounts of paint, varnish, or other foreign material, provided that such devices are equipped with afterburners.

  • Cleaning Operations: Alkaline/phosphate cleaners and associated cleaners and burners.​

Laboratories and Testing

  • Laboratory fume hoods and vents associated with bench-scale laboratory equipment used for physical or chemical analysis.

  • Research and development facilities, quality control testing facilities and/or small pilot projects, where combined daily emissions from all operations are not individually major and are not support facilities making significant contributions to the product of a collocated major manufacturing facility.

Pollution Control

  • Sanitary wastewater collection and treatment systems, except incineration equipment or equipment subject to any standard, limitation or other requirement under Section 111 or 112 (excluding 112(r)) of the Federal Act.
     
  • On site soil or groundwater decontamination units that are not subject to any standard, limitation or other requirement under Section 111 or 112 (excluding 112(r)) of the Federal Act.
     
  • Bioremediation operations units that are not subject to any standard, limitation or other requirement under Section 111 or 112 (excluding 112(r)) of the Federal Act.
     
  • Landfills that are not subject to any standard, limitation or other requirement under Section 111 or 112 (excluding 112(r)) of the Federal Act. 

 Industrial Operations

  • Concrete block and brick plants, concrete products plants, and ready mix concrete plants producing less than 125,000 tons per year.

  • Any of the following processes or process equipment which are electrically heated or which fire natural gas, LPG or distillate fuel oil at a maximum total heat input rate of not more than 5 million Btu's per hour:
    I - Furnaces for heat treating glass or metals, the use of which do not involve molten materials or oil-coated parts.
    II - Porcelain enameling furnaces or porcelain enameling drying ovens.
    III - Kilns for firing ceramic ware.
    IV - Crucible furnaces, pot furnaces, or induction melting and holding furnaces with a capacity of 1,000 pounds or less each, in which sweating or distilling is not conducted and in which fluxing is not conducted utilizing free chlorine, chloride or fluoride derivatives, or ammonium compounds.
    V - Bakery ovens and confection cookers.
     
  • Carving, cutting, routing, turning, drilling, machining, sawing, surface grinding, sanding, planing, buffing, shot blasting, shot peening, or polishing; ceramics, glass, leather, metals, plastics, rubber, concrete, paper stock or wood, also including roll grinding and ground wood pulping stone sharpening, provided that:
    I - The activity is performed indoors; and
    II - No significant fugitive particulate emissions enter the environment; and
    III - No visible emissions enter the outdoor atmosphere.
     
  • Photographic process equipment by which an image is reproduced upon material sensitized to radiant energy (e.g., blueprint activity, photographic developing and microfiche).
     
  • Grain, food, or mineral extrusion processes.
     
  • Equipment used exclusively for sintering of glass or metals, but not including equipment used for sintering metal-bearing ores, metal scale, clay, fly ash, or metal compounds.
     
  • Equipment for the mining and screening of uncrushed native sand and gravel.
     
  • Ozonization process or process equipment.
     
  • Electrostatic powder coating booths with an appropriately designed and operated particulate control system.
     
  • Activities involving the application of hot melt adhesives where VOC emissions are less than 5 tons per year and HAP emissions are less than 1,000 pounds per year.
     
  • Equipment used exclusively for mixing and blending water-based adhesives and coatings at ambient temperatures.
     
  • Equipment used for compression, molding and injection of plastics where VOC emissions are less than 5 tons per year and HAP emissions are less than 1,000 pounds per year.
     
  • Ultraviolet curing processes where VOC emissions are less than 5 tons per year and HAP emissions are less than 1,000 pounds per year.

Storage Tanks and Equipment

  • All petroleum liquid storage tanks storing a liquid with a true vapor pressure of equal to or less than 0.50 psia as stored.
     
  • All petroleum liquid storage tanks with a capacity of less than 40,000 gallons storing a liquid with a true vapor pressure of equal to or less than 2.0 psia as stored that are not subject to any standard, limitation or other requirement under Section 111 or 112 (excluding 112(r)) of the Federal Act.  All petroleum liquid storage tanks with a capacity of less than 10,000 gallons storing a petroleum liquid.  All pressurized vessels designed to operate in excess of 30 psig storing petroleum fuels that are not subject to any standard, limitation or other requirement under Section 111 or 112 (excluding 112(r)) of the Federal Act.  Gasoline storage and handling equipment at loading facilities handling less than 20,000 gallons per day or at vehicle dispensing facilities that are not subject to any standard, limitation or other requirement under Section 111 or 112 (excluding 112(r)) of the Federal Act.  Portable drums, barrels, and totes provided that the volume of each container does not exceed 550 gallons.
     
  • All chemical storage tanks used to store a chemical with a true vapor pressure of less than or equal to 10 millimeters of mercury (0.19 psia).