2014 National Air Toxics Assessment Data

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides national cancer risk summaries in a spreadsheet format.  There are two files summarizing the 2014 NATA modeled cancer risk estimates – one that breaks the risk down by pollutant and one that breaks the risk down by source group.  Both contain modeled cancer risk estimates at the national, state, county, and census tract levels.

Data is organized by tract number. It is an eleven-digit code in which: the first two digits identify the state(13 is for Georgia), the next 3 digits identify the county, and the last six digits are for the census tract (without decimals).  

  •  2014 NATA national cancer risk by pollutant (XLS)  The 2014 NATA modeled cancer risk estimates for lifetime exposure to more than 70 air toxics, including ethylene oxide.   Total cancer risk estimates (expressed as risk in-1-million) for all air toxics modeled are in column G.  Cancer risk estimates for modeled ethylene oxide concentrations (expressed as risk in-1-million) are in column AZ.
  • 2014 NATA national cancer risk by source group (XLS)  The 2014 NATA also modeled cancer risk for lifetime exposure broken down by contribution for each NATA source type (for example, stationary point sources, on-road gas vehicles, etc.) rather than by air toxic.  Total modeled cancer risk estimates for all sources (expressed as risk in-1-million) are in column G.  The contribution of stationary point sources to modeled cancer risk (expressed as risk in-1-million) is in column H. 
  • 2014 NATA data condensed (PDF)  This file was prepared by Georgia EPD by exporting and summarizing the data from the NATA 2014 files above.  Total modeled cancer risk estimates (expressed as risk in-1-million) are in column F (red).  Cancer risk estimates for modeled ethylene oxide concentrations (expressed as risk in-1-million) are in column H (yellow).  The contribution of stationary point sources to modeled cancer risk (expressed as risk in-1-million) is in column K (orange). Please note that column F = column H + column I = column K + column L
  • NATA data limitations (from EPA)  Although EPA reports estimates at the census tract level in NATA, average risk estimates are far more uncertain at this level of spatial resolution than at the state or regional level. To analyze air toxics in smaller areas like a census tract, other tools such as site-specific monitoring and local-scale risk assessment modeling coupled with refined and localized data should be used.
  • Find your census tract:  This is one of many interactive census tract mapping tools available on the web.  Enter an address and matched addresses will return state code, county code, and Census tract code.  If you have trouble matching an address, click the “User Select Tract” box and identify a location on the map using your cursor.